diceline-chartmagnifierquestion-marktwitter-whiteTwitter_Logo_Blue

Today I Learned

How to change JPEG compression rate in WordPress

Our client wants pixel perfect images in his WordPress site. Truth is WordPress is a bit agressive in compressing JPEGs.

WordPress default is 75% compression quality. A higher setting will generate better looking images, to the expense of larger filesize.

Add this to your functions.php file:

// Change JPEG compression rate - 85 is much more reasonable setting
// You can also disable it by settign it to 100
$jpeg_compression = function() { 
	return 85; 
};

add_filter( 'jpeg_quality', $jpeg_compression );

The importance of clear namespaced HTML attributes

Here's another reminder why expressive, namespaced ids are important. This time is about a label's for attribute.

<input id="phone">
<label for="phone"></label

This would work just as expected unless, for example, we have a svg sprite at the beginning of the document that includes an svg with a "phone" id.

<symbol id="phone" viewBox="0 0 61.4 48">...</symbol>
...
<input id="phone">
<label for="phone"></label

In this case, the label's for will match the first in a top-down order that has the target id.

And you will never know why clicking the label won't trigger the input.

How to validate your password with regex

Example password validation regex

  • rules below can be concatenated
^(?=.*?[^a-zA-ZÄÖÜäöüß0-9])(?=.*?[0-9])(?=.*?[a-zäöüß])(?=.*?[A-ZÄÖÜ])(?!.*\d{2,}).{8,}$

Special character matching

  • Matches (operator is ?=) any string that has at least a special character e.g.: sadsds@asdasd
(?=.*?[^a-zA-ZÄÖÜäöüß0-9])

Number matching

  • Matches (operator is ?=) any string that has at least a number: e.g.: s1adsdsasdasd
(?=.*?[0-9])

Small letter matching

  • Matches (operator is ?=) any string that has at least a small letter: e.g.: SADSa
(?=.*?[a-zäöüß])

Big letter matching

  • Matches (operator is ?=) any string that has at least a big letter: e.g.: SADSa
(?=.*?[A-ZÄÖÜ])

Consecutive numbers matching

  • Doesn't match (operator is ?!) strings that have consecutive numbers in them: e.g.: asdasd42dada
(?!.*\d{2,})

Sequential numbers matching (cannot be used at the same time with previous rule)

  • Doesn't match (operator is ?!) strings that have sequential numbers in them: e.g.: 12asdasd42dada
  • It will allow numbers that are separated by other letters e.g.: adasd1asd2asd3
  • It will allow consecutive numbers e.g.: ahadADS22dhsg44
(?!.*((12)|(23)|(34)|(45)|(56)|(67)|(78)|(90)|(01)))

Length of string matching (should be placed last)

  • This will match any string that is less than 8 characters
.{8,}

You can write better jQuery - A DRY approach

From this
$('.multiSelectOne').multiselect({
    buttonClass: 'btn btn-default',
    buttonWidth: '100%',
    ...
});
$('.multiSelectTwo').multiselect({
    buttonClass: 'btn btn-default',
    buttonWidth: '100%',
    nonSelectedText: '---',
    ...
});
To This
<select class="js-multiselect" 
    data-include-select-all-option="true" 
    data-all-selected-text="All">
    <option></option>
</select>
$('.js-multi-select).each(function () {
	let options = {};
  
	Object.entries($(this).data())
		.map(property => options[property[0]] = property[1]);
    
  $(this).multiselect(options); 

}

And never go back for adjustments in the script file ever again.

Work with "unsafe" HTTPS on localhost in Chrome

If you work with HTTPS connections on your localhost development environment, you will often get an un-secure notification from Chrome, and this will be getting annoying.

To disable those notifications in Chrome type this in your address bar:

chrome://flags/

search for:

Allow invalid certificates for resources loaded from localhost.

and click on "Enable". Done!

As a precaution: You should use separate browsers for personal use and another for development. I do development in Chromium and my regular browsing in Safari.